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Von Kliem

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Sidestepping the Excited Delirium Debate

Depending on who you ask, excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is either a group of symptoms that warn of a life-threatening medical condition or it is a diagnosis invented by racist and abusive police to excuse murder.1,2 Among those that use the term ExDS, the medical consensus is that ExDS is not a unique disease but...
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New Study: Grip Strength and Shooting Performance

A new study led by Ph.D. student Andrew Brown1 examined the effects of grip strength and gender on shooting performance.2 Brown and fellow researchers sought to verify independent studies showing that grip strength was directly related to a person’s ability to manage aim, recoil, and trigger pull. These skills are widely recognized as some of...
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New Study: Excited Delirium, Injury, and Use of Force

A new study led by Simon Baldwin1 examined over 10,700 use of force cases and found a significant risk of adverse outcomes in cases involving excited delirium syndrome (ExDS).2 Researchers assumed that an encounter with someone exhibiting probable ExDS might result in adverse outcomes, including greater levels of force and increased risk of injury to...
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Association of Force Investigators (AFI)

The Association of Force Investigators (AFI) is a new association formed to provide training and support for force investigators. AFI brings together local, national, and international police use-of-force experts, including human factors researchers, attorneys, psychologists, use-of-force investigators, and trainers. Through a secure online platform, members can network, communicate, and share resources. Leading experts provide specialized...
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San Francisco Police Peacefully Resolve 99.9% of Crisis-Related Calls!

If you have read the San Francisco Police Crisis Intervention Team 2020 Police Commission Report, you would be forgiven for thinking there was a misprint. Of the nearly 50,000 annual crisis-related calls for service, the San Francisco Police used force only 51 times. That’s a use of force rate of 00.1%. Even with 2800 people...
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New Assault Studies Ready for Publication

The Force Science Institute has completed three new studies on the speed and movements associated with armed assaults. Dr. Bill Lewinski explained: “The goal of our research was to obtain highly accurate measurements to further explore the findings of our earlier studies. Where we once measured movement speeds in the hundredths of a second, we...
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Causing Suspects to Attack You

To participate in police-reform discussions, it’s helpful to appreciate the multiple incentives driving the movement. Some believe that the police are members of a racist system and that violent criminals are merely responding to years of systemic oppression. Others believe that the police provoke violence or simply don’t do enough to avoid it. In either...
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“Progressive” Police-Reform

Where civic leaders embrace “progressive reforms,” such as “equity,” “social justice,” and the “dismantling of systemic racism,” it is no longer obvious that the training, education, and experience of police officers will play a central role.
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Police Progress: Moving Beyond Ideas, Intuition, and Theories

Ideally, police reform will involve the careful translation of research (knowledge) into practice. The American Society of Evidence-Based Policing recently made this case in Process for Translating Research to Practice, citing the requirement for collaboration between researchers and police practitioners.1 It’s this process that ensures reform proposals are not the product of untested ideas, intuition,...
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Rethinking “Show Me Your Hands!”

Officers know that “hands kill” and that they should “watch the hands.” These well-founded concerns are what prompt demands for suspects to “show me your hands!” The irony is that an order to “show me your hands” or “take your hands out of your pockets” may invite the same movement from a compliant suspect as...
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